• Ms. Coffey

"Good Omens" by Neil Gaimen and Terry Pratchett


"DON'T THINK OF IT AS DYING, said Death. JUST THINK OF IT AS LEAVING EARLY TO AVOID THE RUSH." ― Terry Pratchett, Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch

In the late 80s and early 90s, Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett got together to write Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch. The book was published by Gollancz in 1990 and is considered to be horror/ fantasy/ and comedy. Amazon Prime also just came out with a book to mini-series adaptation starring Michael Sheen and David Tennant (if you are interested). 


Our main character, Crowley, is a demon, but he isn't really a good one. He doesn't care about causing harm to humans or making the world a crappy place. He even failed at the most crucial job the devil gave him. Our other main character is Aziraphale, an angel. He also has become accustomed to his life on Earth. He doesn't want to see his priceless library destroyed by the end of the world (and what book lover wouldn't). Both of them agree to work together to find the Anti-Christ and stop the upcoming Armageddon. 


Good Omens is a fun and whimsical book that is all about saving the world. The plot is unpredictable, cleaver, and rediculous. There are numerous movies, TV shows, and books about Armageddon, but Good Omens brings a refreshing twist. Since the main focus of the book is the language, I find the plot to be slow most of the time. I repeatedly had to push myself to continue reading instead of having the plot motivating me. 


The writing style is incredibly unique. The language is not conversational, but it has a bizarre flair. Due to the complicated writing, I had to mentally prepare to read this book. The title of the book is an excellent example of Gaiman and Pratchett's writing style.


The world that Gaiman and Pratchett created is one of a kind. The biblical elements of the book serve as a framework for the world that the authors created. I think the world is a perfect balance of religious ideology and fantasy. 


The book follows a linear storyline. It is well organized and planned out. There is a clear direction, and you know where the story is heading. The best part is that you just didn't know how the characters were going to accomplish their goals. 


To put it plainly, the characters are fantastic. Crowley and Aziraphale are wild and entertaining, and I have never seen a dynamic like that before. Their dialog is hysterical. I found myself looking forward to their next sassy encounter all the time. The side characters are also fun to read. I thought they balanced the story out with their alternative perspectives for the end of the world. 


The symbols of good and evil were dominant in this novel. For obvious reasons, the angel and demon did not behave like they were supposed to. The breaking-out-of-social-expectations was enjoyable to read.


My favorite part was reading about the satanic nuns and how they lost the antichrist. I thought that was crazy. They had one job, and they couldn't even do that. 


The most significant issues to me were the slow plot and confusing writing style. I thought the authors gave a lot of useless information that was supposed to be funny. Since the language was so outrageous, I found myself confused most of the time. 


The writing style did negatively affected my overall reading experience. The writing was so out-there that I almost didn't finish the book. I skimmed the last 50 pages, so I knew what happened. I thought the main characters were fresh and original, but unfortunately, they couldn't save this book for me. I could not get past the confusing writing style, off-topic tangents, and slow plot development. With all of that information, I rate Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch 3 out of 5 stars. I recommend this book to anyone that enjoys complex writing styles, angels and demons, and funny books. 


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